Subscribe to On the Editor's Desk RSS Feed

On the Editor's Desk

by: Paul Ragusa - Wednesday, September 18, 2019

It probably wasn’t the best idea for me — physically speaking, that is — to try and play 7 innings (no snickering!) of softball this past Sunday in support of the Mission 500 Security Softball Game, held on a beautiful day in Overpeck Park, New Jersey.


That realization was driven home (no pun intended) late in the game when I had to score all the way from first base, which is tougher than it sounds (again, no snickering). As I high-fived my teammates and gasped for air entering the dugout, I promised that if I survived I would write about how rewarding it was to help support such a great organization as Mission 500, which organized another successful charity event to help families and children in need.

All told, more than $41,000 was raised and 400 children living in severe poverty in the South Bronx received backpacks filled with school supplies. The backpacks were assembled over the course of the day, with the opportunity to include a note of encouragement and inspiration to the children who would be receiving these backpacks. One of the things I wrote, “don’t be afraid to dream big,” for me speaks to the goal of Mission 500 — to help level the playing field for those who are less fortunate.
 
The day before, security industry executives also volunteered with Habitat for Humanity Paterson, framing walls and pouring concrete for two families in need as part of a community build project.

In addition, $2,500 was donated to the New York Firefighters Burn Center Foundation Children’s Camp, a non-for-profit dedicated to the advancement of burn care, research, prevention, education, and the proper treatment of burns. This organization sends burn victims under the age of 18 to a camp where they can come together and put their scars aside, while having fun at summer camp. Mission 500said it is “proud to support the camp for a third year in a row.”

Tom Nolan, Mission 500’s Director Strategic Partnerships, told me during the day that he was “very pleased” with the turnout for the Habitat for Humanity build and the charity softball game, and was excited about the number of people already committed to participating in the Mission 500 Service Trip to Puerto Rico, Oct. 9-13.

Security industry professionals looking to support Mission 500 can help by joining or making a donation towards this year’s service trip to Puerto Rico, volunteering to help with the Security 5K/2K at ISC West 2020, participating in a teambuilding event with their colleagues or customers, or by making financial donations.

At the charity softball game this past Sunday, American Security was the sponsor that raised the most funds, and was joined by the following sponsors for the event: Alarm Shield, Altronix, American Security, Anixter, Assa Abloy, Axis Communications, Beacon Protection, Criticom Monitoring Services, Dahua USA, DMP, ESA New Jersey Chapter, Hikvision USA, ISC Events, Ken Gould Consulting, Lensec, LRG Marketing, M2M Services, Napco StarLink, NYFAA, Rapid Response, ScanSource, Security Sales & Integration, Security Systems News, Security Today and Statewide Monitoring.

It was great to support and be a part of such a great day of giving back and having some fun. Not to gloat, but my team, the Protection Pirates, won 21-16, over the Security Sluggers, in a hard-fought game that ended in hand shakes and smiles, and personally speaking, a few scrapes, bruises and sore muscles.

Hope to see you all on the field next year! Click here for more on Mission 500.

Topic:
by: Paul Ragusa - Wednesday, September 11, 2019

There’s been a lot of activity with ADT Commerical lately and it looks like the commercial side of business continues to grow organically and through acquisition. ADT Commerical recently acquired Design Systems Group and purchased Systems Group and Fusion Fire Protection to further broaden its commercial presence. In fact, ADT's commerial side of the business now accounts for nearly $1 billion in revenue.

Here’s a little bit about each of the acquired companies and what each company’s president has to say about the acquisition.

Systems Group is headquartered in Denver and provides commercial fire alarm detection, installation, inspection and maintenance services in Colorado. It was founded in 2004 and specializes in installation and service of integrated fire alarm, fire sprinkler, distributed antenna systems (DAS) and mass notification systems. 

“The team here at Systems Group has built a company admired and respected by the industry and customers alike,” John Ballman, Systems Group president said in the announcement. “Becoming a part of the ADT Commercial organization takes us to a higher level, both in terms of delivering for clients, and further achieving professional status for our employees.”

Fusion Fire Protection is headquartered in Hanover, Md. and serves the fire sprinkler systems needs of customers in Baltimore, Washington, D.C., and Northern Virginia. Established in 2015, in its short run, the company has earned the respect and loyalty of commercial customers. 

“Aligning with ADT Commercial reinforces our customer-centric commitment by strengthening and expanding our ability to deliver the most advanced technologies while still maintaining our agility and responsiveness,” Joe Roberts, Fusion Fire partner and president, said. 

Both companies are staffed by NICET-certified professionals enabling them to assist customers with design, project management, system installation, and testing, service and maintenance. 

“Systems Group in Denver and Fusion Fire Protection in Maryland represent the very best of the best in the fire alarm, fire sprinkler, and life safety arena, and illustrate our consistent dedication to best serve the needs of our mid-market, national and large-scale commercial customers,” Dan Bresingham, executive vice president, ADT Commercial, expressed.

Existing customers of both Systems Groups and Fusion Fire Protection will continue to work with the same people they know and trust to manage their accounts, now with ADT Commercial’s added resources and reach. 

“The addition of these tenured, well-trained professional teams furthers our aim of offering an advanced suite of end-to-end solutions for security, life safety and fire,” Michael McWilliams, senior vice president field operations, ADT Commercial said. “Backed by the strength of a nationally recognized organization, these teams will be empowered by local leadership, and will continue to provide the level of service expected by their customers.”  

I wonder what ADT’s next move will be? Rest assured that you will be the first to know as I keep my eyes and ears open and on the pulse of this company.

 
by: Paul Ragusa - Wednesday, September 4, 2019

The global smart home market is forecast to grow by nearly a factor of five to reach more than $192 billion in 2023, up from $41 billion In 2018, according to the latest Smart Home Device Database from IHS Markit.

The research firm noted that the United States led all countries in 2018, representing about 35 percent of global market revenue. China was second, accounting for an 18 percent share.


The fastest-growing device types in the market include lighting, smart speakers and connected major home appliances, according to Blake Kozak, principal analyst for IHS.

“The brilliance of the smart home is that it can be molded to suit the requirements of any kind of consumer, from the strictest demands of power users to the simplest automation needs of dabblers,” said Kozak. “Irrespective of consumer tech-savviness, the smart-home market has bourgeoned into a consumer technology heavyweight, eager to move beyond the basics of security and single-family homes and into uncharted opportunities. However, these uncharted opportunities are coming with concerns about privacy and the technology’s readiness for primetime. The remainder of 2019 and start of 2020 will be a pivotal time for the smart-home market as companies and service providers fine-tune their strategies and reposition to compete with the smart home juggernauts — as well as newcomers looking to upend the status quo.”

Smart-home companies look to future opportunities

Kozak pointed out that companies looking to make waves in the smart home market include IKEA and newcomers such as Wyze, which offer ultra-low-cost devices.

He added that major players also will make pivotal strategy changes to enhance their competitiveness, with examples including Google, which recently ended its  “Works with Nest” program. In another example, he pointed to Amazon Alexa, which achieved compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA).

“For its part, Ring is launching into the small-medium businesses (SMB) segment,” said Kozak. “Comcast will focus on its Xfinity platform and hone its strategy around content deployment. Meanwhile, Centrica, which offers the Hive smart home, plans to focus its platform on energy and services.

Software, analytics and partnerships

A brief hiatus in hardware development has prompted smart-home companies to make advancements with software, analytics and acquisitions/partnerships, according to IHS. However, Kozak noted that another hardware push is set to arrive soon, with the arrival of new smart speakers from Google, Apple and Samsung as well as offerings for insurance companies and apartment complexes.

US smart-home penetration rises, despite privacy concerns

Although the U.S. smart-home penetration exceeded 38 percent in 2018, IHS said the market’s further progress could be impeded by privacy concerns, which is why IHS is advising technology providers to take steps to alleviate consumer apprehension.

“Rapid innovation often breeds speculation and mistrust,” Kozak said. “Because of that, smart-home companies should be as transparent as possible regarding data usage. They also should focus on edge-based processing, which reduces the need for cloud-based computing systems that send private data over the internet. The smart home should also make greater efforts to comply with standards and regulations for sectors such as security, healthcare and senior care. By having more standards and regulations in place, innovation in the smart home will be less a source of anxiety for consumers and instead become a cause for optimism and a fulcrum for peace-of-mind.”

The IHS Markit Smart Home Device Database assesses the market for smart home devices including unit shipments, installed base, housing type, route to market, system type, connectivity type, network controller, country/sub-region and market shares.

by: Paul Ragusa - Friday, August 23, 2019

Anyone who has fallen victim to the dreaded “porch pirates” can understand why the current smart home trend of in-home delivery of packages continues to catch on. Nothing sucks more than having video footage — from a video doorbell or camera — of someone grabbing your goods off your stoop and having no power to do anything about it. 

It is this convergence of technology and convenience that is driving interest in, and spending on, security. In fact, nearly half of consumers who currently own or intend to buy a smart door lock, a smart garage door opener or video doorbell value the ability to remotely allow Amazon package deliveries, according to new research from Parks Associates, an internationally recognized market research and consulting company specializing in emerging consumer technology products and services.

“Battle for the Front Door: The Access Control Ecosystem” reports that one-third of owners or future buyers rate this capability as very valuable, with 37 percent of smart access control device owners or intenders willing to pay up to $1.98 per package for delivery inside their home or garage.

“The growth of online shopping from sites like Amazon and Walmart has led to an increasing problem of package theft but has also created a new use case for the smart home,” Chris O’Dell, research associate, Parks Associates, said in the announcement. “As consumers increasingly rely on home package delivery, and look for ways to make this process more secure, they have a greater awareness of access control devices like video doorbells, smart door locks and smart garage door openers.”

The prospect of package theft creates opportunity for smart home device manufacturers and service providers to boost consumer confidence by guaranteeing safe package delivery with in-home and in-garage delivery services. Amazon’s 2019 partnership with Chamberlain highlights this potential. Among consumers who own or plan to buy a smart door lock, a smart garage door opener or video doorbell, 43 percent find the ability for FedEx or UPS to perform in-garage delivery to be valuable.

“Enabling home services will ultimately drive adoption of access control devices by expanding their value to consumers,” O’Dell said. “Traditional garage door openers typically have a lifecycle of 10 or more years, so companies need a strong and unique value proposition with smart garage door openers in order to expedite growth in the market. The promise of safe package delivery, combined with partnerships that incent purchase and ease installation concerns, can be that driver.”

Found in the report is an assessment of the access control ecosystem, profiles of key players in each device category and evaluations of home services strategies. It also includes five-year forecasts of smart door lock, video doorbell and smart garage door opener adoption. For example, one-quarter of U.S. broadband households plan to purchase a video doorbell in the next year.

Topic:
by: Paul Ragusa - Wednesday, August 21, 2019

If you’re part of the security industry, there’s little doubt you haven’t heard about the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) rule announced last week that started the ball rolling on the prohibition to procure certain Chinese telecommunications and video surveillance equipment. The key word here is “certain,” meaning not all equipment is part of the rule, and security contractors are left scrambling trying to figure out exactly what to do.

The Security Industry Association (SIA) jumped into action and released a preliminary analysis of the rule that focuses specifically on the video surveillance equipment and services covered. SIA also stated that they will update the analysis with additional insight and information as needed, and the association will host a webinar tomorrow, August 22 at 1pm ET to brief members on its analysis of the NDAA prohibition and acquisition rules.

According to SIA’s analysis, security contractors need to understand the following:

Remember the effective date, August 13, 2019. Why is this so important? Because all solicitations, contracts and contract awards issued on or after this date will include clauses prohibiting procurement of covered equipment and services.

Disclosure requirements for new contracts. Beginning on the effective date, all offerors must provide self-certification as to whether ANY of their offerings to the federal government include covered equipment or services. This also extends to subcontractors.

Reporting requirements. Beginning on the effective date, contractors and subcontractors are required to report any covered equipment, system or services provided and discovered during contract performance within one day of discovery. In addition, within 10 days, the contractor must explain mitigation actions taken or recommended.

Scope of prohibition. Extends to purchases below the minimum purchasing threshold (up to $10,000 in 2019), regardless of the commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) waiver.

Government-only waivers. Contractors and companies cannot obtain waivers; they are only available for government entities.

Tailored approach to collected information. GSA has issued its tailored implementation rules.

For more detailed information about NDAA and FAR, including a answers to frequently asked questions relating to the ban, please check out SIA’s full analysis here, and attend SIA’s webinar.

Topic:
by: Paul Ragusa - Wednesday, August 14, 2019

On Tuesday, Aug. 13, the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) rule implementing the first subsection of the procurement prohibition on certain Chinese telecommunications and video surveillance equipment was announced.

Notably, the rule covers only the provision of the fiscal year 2019 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) Section 889 set to go into effect one year following enactment — subsection (a)(1)(A) relating to direct government procurement of covered equipment and services. The remaining provisions of Section 889 (including applicability to the use of federal grant funds) are scheduled to go into effect in August 2020.

While the Security Industry Association (SIA) is working to provide members with a preliminary analysis of the rule as quickly as possible, these rules and contract clauses added to the FAR should be carefully reviewed by suppliers of video surveillance equipment to the government.

The rule prohibits federal agencies from buying “covered telecommunications equipment or services as a substantial or essential component of any system, or as critical technology as part of any system” from designated Chinese entities, including:

•    Telecommunications equipment produced by Huawei or ZTE and their affiliates;
•    Video surveillance and telecommunications equipment produced by Hytera Communications Corporation (Hytera), Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology Company (Hikvision), Zhejiang Dahua Technology Co., Ltd. (Dahua) or their affiliates for the purpose of public safety, security of government facilities, physical security surveillance of critical infrastructure and other national security purposes;
•    Telecommunications or video surveillance services provided by any of these entities or using any such equipment; and
•    Telecommunications or video surveillance equipment or services produced or provided by an entity that the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Director of National Intelligence or the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, reasonably believes to be an entity owned or controlled by, or otherwise connected to, the Chinese government.

In a comprehensive analysis of the interim rule, Morrison & Foerster said, “DoD, GSA and NASA are working to update the online System for Award Management (SAM) to allow contractors to represent annually whether they sell covered equipment or services. Only contractors that provide an affirmative representation in SAM will be required to provide offer-by-offer disclosures in their proposals for contracts or task orders. This option is not available yet, so contractors should expect to see the representation incorporated into solicitations starting August 13.

“The second clause — FAR 52.204-25 — incorporates Section 889’s prohibitions and definitions into the contract and also imposes a significant reporting requirement on the contractor. The reporting requirement obligates the contractor to report through DIBNet if it identifies any activity prohibited by the rule during contract performance. Contractors must do so within one business day of identifying the activity, and then follow up within 10 business days with any additional information about mitigation actions undertaken or recommended.”

Morrison & Foerster also pointed out that by October 14, 2019, the Secretary of Commerce “must issue new restrictions implementing the May Executive Order declaring a national emergency over the influx of telecommunications technology developed by ‘foreign adversaries’ and entities controlled by them. Implementing regulations will identify covered entities and transactions, almost certainly targeting entities like Huawei and ZTE,” Morrison & Foerster analysts opined.

Stay tuned for more on this topic.

Topic:
by: Paul Ragusa - Wednesday, August 7, 2019

The role of robotics within security continues to increase, as the technology can act as a force multiplier, expand the scope and effectiveness of security around and within a perimeter, including everything from small to expansive areas. Drones, for example, have come a long way in just a couple of years, and are starting to be used in commercial and industrial senarios, as well as in and around home.

With drone technology advancing at a fast rate, FAA regulations loosening, and more accessible off-the-shelf solutions available, we may be at a turning point when it comes to increased adoption of drones within security, according to a recent whitepaper, Drones in Security & Surveillance, by FlytBase, an enterprise drone automation company.

“The physical security market is primed for drone automation and scaling — the time, cost and safety benefits of autonomous drone fleets can create significant business value for this industry,” FlytBase CEO Nitin Gupta, said in the announcement of the white paper. “Drone patrols will augment human guards and enable security agencies, risk managers, security directors, system integrators and other stakeholders to make faster, better decisions for real-time incident response, remote security operations, event management, disaster response and more.”

The ability to deploy in a multitude of 24/7 security and surveillance use-cases is helping to drive increased demand and adoption of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), said Flytbase, noting that UAVs address many user/customer pain points, including:
     •    High turnover of security guards;
     •    Operations at night and in hostile scenarios;
     •    Surveillance of hard-to-reach locations;
     •    Liabilities associated with human and helicopter patrols;
     •    CCTV blind spots; and
     •    Need for real-time situational awareness in emergencies, etc.

“The time for aerial security is now ripe because the prosumer drone market has matured so rapidly in the last few years that commercial-off-the-shelf drones can be used commercially, instead of (expensive, monolithic, low reliability) custom drones, in all but the most demanding security and surveillance use-cases,” according to the white paper. “The physical security market is one of the most compelling target segments for the commercial drone industry. As automation technology is adopted for industrial and commercial security, drone fleets will play a central role, given that they can be deployed autonomously, at scale.” 

The two obvious obstacles for driving broad adoption of drones in aerial security use-cases tended to be:
     •    Hardware (battery life, sensor quality, flight stability, etc.); and
     •    Regulation (especially for beyond visual-line-of-sight i.e. BVLOS operations)

However, these are now turning enablers, with the emergence of:
     •    Reliable, off-the-shelf drones that are affordable and programmable; and
     •    FAA integrated pilot programs, EVLOS relaxations, Part 107 certifications and UAS Remote ID.

As UAV regulations mature, security agencies in particular are expected to rapidly   adopt drones to substantially reduce their operating costs, improve perimeter coverage and awareness, and to minimize occupational, health and safety risks to human guards.  Despite a variety of relevant use-cases, the enterprise adoption of drones in this sector remains at the proof-of-concept and pilot stage; for production deployments to become widespread, three enablers are needed:

     1.    Drone-in-a-box hardware that is cost-effective and yet reliable;
     2.    SaaS solutions that automate drones, are scalable and yet hardware-agnostic; and
     3.    Integrated offerings that require low investment, & hence pay back in < 1 year.

“For VLOS and EVLOS security operations, the drone-in-a-box requirement is less critical,” the white paper noted. “Thus, security agencies, domain consultants, drone  system integrators, managed service providers and end users can all get started with off-the-shelf, prosumer-grade drones and existing SaaS offerings, and eventually add docking stations and charging pads to their autonomous drone security operations.”

Click here for the complete white paper.

by: Paul Ragusa - Wednesday, July 31, 2019

Security industry confidence continues to rise with the summer temps, according to The Security Industry Association’s latest Security Market Index, a bimonthly measure and outlook for the security industry.

While confidence in the state of the market had already seen a bump in May with a Security Market Index (SMI) of 63, up from the March SMI of 60, hopes are even higher this month with a July 2019 SMI of 71, SIA reported, noting that any Index above 50 indicates that conditions within the industry are largely positive and that security industry professionals are predominantly confident in their business outlooks.

Special focuses of the July 2019 SMI include:
•    A continuously climbing SMI for security consultants;
•    Despite other sectors' increases, a dip in confidence for the video surveillance SMI;
•    Integrators increasing spending among decreases in overall confidence in business conditions; and
•    Expected security spending increases in government and education.

For its July SMI, SIA found that 48 percent of security professionals rated current business conditions as “excellent,” and 45 percent said they were “good.” Only 7 percent said conditions were “average,” and no Security Market Index respondents considered current conditions to be “fair” or “poor.” In May 2019, 49 percent of respondents said conditions were “excellent,” and 38 percent rated conditions as “good.” Eight percent said conditions were “average,” 5 percent rated conditions as “fair” and no Security Market Index respondents rated conditions as “poor.”

SIA noted that multiple respondents said that there is a strong demand from customers for security system upgrades, as well as new installations, while others pointed out the strong acquisition activity currently happening within the security market. And while the responses were mostly positive, some pointed out what they see as current issues in the industry. “While the economy appears strong, we’re seeing a lot of pressure to cut prices,” said a respondent working in the access control sector, who rated current business conditions as “good.” One respondent who works as an engineer in the industry rated current business conditions as “good,” but expressed worry over the U.S. president’s relations with Europe, saying, “Unnecessary business risk results.”

While numbers remained steady in most key factors (new orders; product/service sales; new product intro; and capital equip spend) this July, SIA found that the percentage of respondents who said they plan on increasing their number of employees or hours worked jumped to 76 percent, when only 56 percent said so in May.

Within the next three months, 90 percent of security professionals believe business conditions will be either “much better” or “a little better,” SIA found, with 10 percent expecting no change to business conditions, and zero Security Market Index respondents expecting conditions to be worse. This is slightly more optimistic than in May, when 87 percent expected improved conditions within three months.

When SIA asked which vertical market they think has the most potential for increased security spending in the next five years, many respondents to the July SMI answered government and education, with 24 percent answering government, and 21 percent answering education. Other answers included healthcare (17 percent), cannabis (10 percent), office buildings (7 percent) and energy (3 percent).
  
In regard to increased government business, SIA referenced a Dec. 2018 U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) report, Federal Building Security: Actions Needed to Help Achieve Vision for Secure, Interoperable Physical Access Control, which pointed out the need for improved security in government buildings and a government-wide approach to regulate access to controlled areas in federal buildings using access control systems such as card readers.   

“Implementation of physical access control systems at federal agencies represents a significant federal investment,” stated the report. “For example, over the next five years the Transportation Security Agency plans to spend about $73 million to implement physical access control systems . . . In addition, according to GSA officials, GSA has spent millions of dollars to test these systems.”   

School security has also proven to be a booming market for the security industry, with bills requiring security spending in schools and grants for security systems in schools being introduced at a rapid rate, SIA reported.  The education sector of the market for security equipment spending and services reached $2.7 billion in revenue in 2017, according to a 2018 report from IHS Markit, School Security Systems Industry – U.S. Market Overview. The market is expected to grow an average of 1 percent annually, reaching $2.8 billion by 2021. However, the report warns that since so much progress has been made in securing schools over recent years, security spending may actually slow in the market.

For the full Security Market Index, including a breakdown by segment click here

by: Paul Ragusa - Friday, July 19, 2019

For the past few years here at SSN we have been paying more and more attention to cybersecurity and its role within physical security, looking at it from as many different security perspectives as possible — end user, consultant, specifier, commercial integrator, supplier — you name it and we’ve probably written about it!

With cybersecurity playing such a prominent role in physical security today, we have added a section on our site that is completely devoted to our cybersecurity coverage. The convergence of physical and IT security is happening, and what better place to stay up to date on the latest happenings in the cybersecurity space than right here at SSN.

Some of our recent cyber-related stories include a great piece from SSN Contributing Editor Lilly Chapa, who attended the recent SIAGovSummit, about how the federal government aims to modernize physical security practices. As she points out, government agencies intend to evolve their security approach to address changing technology, threats and budgets, including working closer with cybersecurity and IT professionals.

Another interesting story worth checking out is by SSN Managing Editor Ginger Schlueter, who spoke with Cyber Criminologist Dr. Peter Stephenson about the art of data forensics.

Plus, she will be attending Cyber:Secured Summit at The Westin Dallas Park Central, July 29-31, and providing full coverage of the event here on the site as well, which you can find by just clicking on the Cybersecurity tab at the top of the site.

Dive right in here.

Topic:
by: Paul Ragusa - Wednesday, July 17, 2019

The increasing focus on safe cities and securing sports events and concerts in stadiums is aiding expansion of the global Stadium Security Market. 

The global market was valued at $6.2 billion in 2017 and is expected to reach $16.1 billion by 2025, growing at a CAGR of 12.8 percent during the forecast period, according to a new report from Fortune Business Insights based in Pune, India.

The report, titled “Stadium Security Market: Global Market Analysis, Insights and Forecast, 2018-2025,” offers insights into the market and the rising importance on public safety and security in stadiums across the world. According to the study, stadium owners are now installing well-equipped security systems including metal detectors, intrusion alarm systems, access control systems, CCTV cameras, facial recognition systems and fire alarm systems.

“Technological advancements such as adoption of Internet of Things (IoT) in stadium security systems is expected to enhance the spectator experience,” noted one of the lead analysts on the study. “Upgradation of stadium security plan can offer a convenient and personalized experience to spectators and simultaneously ensures complete security.” Moreover, IoT adoption helps in the effective management of stadium infrastructure, contributing towards the growth of the market, he said.

As per seating capacity, stadiums with capacity between 30,000 and 50,000 are anticipated to grow at a rapid pace driven by rising number of events and concerts, growing at a CAGR of 13.4 percent and. On the other hand, stadiums with a capacity of less than 30,000 seats are projected to account for the highest share in the global market. However, this segment is anticipated to exhibit a CAGR of 12.5 percent during the forecast period.                     
                                                                         
North America is expected to lead the global Stadium Security Market in the forecast years. Predominantly, Canada and the U.S are on alert for terrorist attacks, which compels the stadium owners to adopt stadium security solutions. Rapid technological advancements in stadium security systems and growing demand for maintaining stadium infrastructure are driving the market in North America. The market in Asia Pacific is expected to gain an impressive share in the forecast years.
 
Increasing terrorist threats and pressing need for ensuring public safety are compelling companies to develop innovative and smart stadium security measures. “To gain an edge over strong competition, several leading players are installing stadium security systems at some major stadiums to maintain their position in the global market,” the research firm found.

The top 10 players covered two-third of the share in the global market in 2017, the study noted, including:
•    Avigilon Corp.
•    AxxonSoft
•    BOSCH Security Systems
•    CISCO Systems Inc.
•    Dallmeier
•    Genetec Inc.
•    Honeywell International Inc.
•    Intel Corporation
•    NEC Corporation
•    Rapiscan Systems
 

Pages